September Line-Up and New Reviews

I can’t believe September is here already. I am so excited for this month on the blog because I have great things lined up to share with you all!

September 15: MAX AT NIGHT Blog Tour

max at night

September 20: YOU’RE MY BOO Book Review and Author Interview

youre my boo

September 22: THE STORYBOOK KNIGHT Blog Tour and author/illustrator interview

storybook knight

With the blog tours, I will have lots of great links and bonus content to share for each book. I just love blog tours 🙂

Then in October, I have spooky books lined up for the whole month, plus I’ll be hosting a special event at my store for kids. There will be more interviews and blog tours as well.

I feel so lucky to have so many opportunities to share great books and new authors with you all.

Today I have three great new books to share and I hope you will all get a chance to check them out at some point.

Happy Reading!


mind boggling number

Mind-Boggling Numbers (2016, Lerner Publishing Group, Non-Fiction Picture Book)

Can a piggy bank hold 1 million pennies? How many glasses of lemonade would it take to fill a swimming pool? Is it possible to send a birthday card to everyone on the planet? This book has all the answers, and the numbers are mind-boggling!

Mind-Boggling Numbers, written by Michael J. Rosen and illustrated by Julia Patton, is an incredibly fun read! Written in question and answer format, the questions are both fun and puzzling, resulting in some fascinating answers. Children and adults will find the math engaging, and everyone is certain to learn something new. The questions present unrealistic situations, but then use real math processes to reach the answer. These word problems are way more fun than figuring out traditional problems. The illustrations accompanying each Q & A are charming and funny, and will keep children entertained as they contemplate each dilemma. And to top it off, at the end of the book, each problem is worked through in depth, showing the math steps necessary to reach each answer. Any book that can introduce math in a fun and entertaining way is a definite winner!


herbies big adventure

Herbie’s Big Adventure (2016, Capstone, Picture Book)

Herbie is just a little hedgehog but he’s growing fast and his Mother says it’s time for him to go on a big adventure. Herbie doesn’t feel ready for a big adventure all by himself, but he leaves home anyway. What awaits little Herbie in the big, adventurous world?

Herbie’s Big Adventure, written and illustrated by Jennie Poh, is a great reminder for both parents and children that sometimes children are ready to experience things on their own without parental guidance or supervision. The theme of independence, self-reliance, and resourcefulness is well-told but other aspects of the story distract from the poignant message. Herbie encounters obstacles along the way, and when he seeks shelter, the words and accompanying illustrations might be confusing to children. Otherwise the illustrations are precious and delightful, inspiring children to go on their own big adventure.


the changelings

The Changelings (2016, Sourcebooks Jabberwocky, Middle-Grade Fantasy)

After inheriting her Grandmother’s house, Izzy and her family move to the most boring town ever. Izzy is certain nothing exciting will ever happen to her here, until she starts hearing stories about the witch who lives next door. Soon Izzy and her little sister, Hen, discover strange piles of rocks around their house and shadows slipping through the woods behind the house. It’s all exciting and fun until Izzy hears mysterious music and Hen disappears into the forest behind their house. Now, with only the neighborhood “witch” to help, Izzy sets out on a wild adventure to save her sister.

The Changelings, written by Christina Soontornvat, is something of a modern day fairy tale. With tales of faeries and changelings, this book will likely spark interest in older, traditional fairy tales such as those by Hans Christian Andersen or the Brothers Grimm. Most middle-grade fantasy seems to focus on witches and wizards, so a book with a different focus in the realm of fantasy is refreshing. The book is entertaining and children will love the characters, mystery and magical aspects, but the beginning feels rushed. There is little set up for the story, and much of the information about the neighbor being a witch is established by a conversation with the cashier at the local grocery store. This introduction does not feel authentic, as the setting and neighborhood has not yet been described in detail and certainly not in a creepy context. Once the story progresses, and Izzy enters the faerie realm, the plot picks up and becomes more engaging. A fun read for children ages 8 and up.


Thank you to Net Galley and the publishers for reading copies of these books in exchange for my honest review.